Suboxone Sublingual tablets

What is Suboxone Sublingual tablets?

Suboxone Sublingual tablets contains a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is an opioid medication, sometimes called a narcotic. Naloxone blocks the effects of opioid medication, including pain relief or feelings of well-being that can lead to opioid abuse.

Suboxone is used to treat narcotic (opiate) addiction.

Suboxone is not for use as a pain medication.
Alternatives to Suboxone

There are alternative drugs in different forms available to treat opioid use disorder.

Talk with your healthcare provider which option would be best suited to you.

Buprenorphine

IM injection (Sublocade), Implant (Probuphine), Sublingual (Subutex)

Buprenorphine and naloxone

Sublingual (Bunavail, Zubsolv)

Lofexidine

Tablets (Lucemyra)

Methadone

Tablets (Dolophine)

Naltrexone

IM injection (Vivitrol), Naltrexone tablets

For opioid overdose in an emergency situation:

Naloxone

Nasal spray (Narcan, Kloxxado), Naloxone injection

Other related medicines:

Buprenorphine for severe pain:

IM injection (Buprenex), Sublingual (Belbuca), Transdermal patch (Butrans)

Warnings

Suboxone Sublingual tablets can slow or stop your breathing, and may be habit-forming. MISUSE OF THIS MEDICINE CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH, especially in a child or other person using the medicine without a prescription.

Taking Suboxone during pregnancy may cause life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in the newborn.

Fatal side effects can occur if you use this medicine with alcohol, or with other drugs that cause drowsiness or slow your breathing.
Before taking this medicine

You should not use Suboxone if you are allergic to buprenorphine or naloxone (Narcan).

To make sure Suboxone is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

breathing problems, sleep apnea;

enlarged prostate, urination problems;

liver or kidney disease;

abnormal curvature of the spine that affects breathing;

problems with your gallbladder, adrenal gland, or thyroid;

a head injury, brain tumor, or seizures; or

alcoholism or drug addiction.

If you use Suboxone while you are pregnant, your baby could become dependent on the drug. This can cause life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in the baby after it is born. Babies born dependent on opioids may need medical treatment for several weeks.

Ask a doctor before using Suboxone if you are breastfeeding. Tell your doctor if you notice severe drowsiness or slow breathing in the nursing baby.
How should I take Suboxone?

Use Suboxone exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides. Never use Suboxone in larger amounts, or for longer than prescribed. Tell your doctor if you feel an increased urge to use more of this medicine.

Before taking a Suboxone sublingual film, drink water to moisten your mouth. This helps the film dissolve more easily. Place one film on the inside of your right or left cheek. If your doctor tells you to take 2 films at a time, place the other film on the inside of the opposite cheek. Keep the films in place until they have completely dissolved. If your doctor tells you to take a third film, place it on the inside of your right or left cheek after the first 2 films have dissolved.

While the film is dissolving, do not chew or swallow the film because the medicine will not work as well.

Suboxone sublingual tablets should be placed under the tongue until they dissolve.

Never share Suboxone with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. MISUSE CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH. Keep the medicine in a place where others cannot get to it. Selling or giving away Suboxone is against the law.

If you switch between medicines containing buprenorphine, you may not use the same dose for each one. Follow all directions carefully.

Do not stop using Suboxone suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using this medicine.

You will need frequent blood tests to check your liver function.

All your medical care providers should know that you are being treated for opioid addiction, and that you take Suboxone. Make sure your family members know how to provide this information in case they need to speak for you during an emergency.

Never crush or break a Suboxone sublingual tablet to inhale the powder or mix it into a liquid to inject the drug into your vein. This practice has resulted in death. READMORE

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